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Wiring for 1 Phase 460 Volt Evaporator Motor (Carrier Transicold)
Wiring for 1 Phase 460 Volt Evaporator Motor (Carrier Transicold)

Am repurposing a refrigerated shipping container that has a couple of these fans in it:

https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Carrier-Transicold-54-00585-20-2_60788106493.html

Each unit has 7 wires:

Blue
Orange
Yellow
White
Brown
Brown
Green

The closest I've come across is this image:

http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/AS/AssuredElectrical/2014-08-06_102545_dayton_motor_and_4uye8_drum_2.jpg

But it is not quite the same (I have no black or red.)

I want to run at 240v, and am thinking I can wire pretty much like the diagram above. But if any one has a better picture of what should be done, that would be appreciated.

Thanks

This may be of help:

https://files.carrier.com/container-refrigeration/en/worldwide/contentimages/TL_06_07-12.pdf

Just jumper in a 220v fan motor from one of the switched 440v (T1 say) to common (ground) and do a bump test.

your 3 phase wiring is 440 phase to phase, but 220 phase to ground (green).

A volt meter test on the unit first if it is currently on 3ph, first and note the on-off cycles.

Motor bump test without fan blades to limit the torque if jumpered in.

Make sure the RPM and the horse power match first, or you risk smoking the motor under load. Check the current rating of the switching relay contacts as a precaution.

The three phase units use a lot less power than single phase, you'd be better off getting a 3-ph supply long term, but that's your call,

don't fool with the compressor as that requires tearing into the Freon piping,

good day, good luck,

Thanks d.

Well it turned out to be a little more of a mission. Apparently the motors are two speed, and higher speed coils were burnt out.

One motor had two capacitors and could be started in low speed, but the other didn't. I had a small fright tonight as I'd tested yesterday with 240v, then replaced the bearings and out back together only to find the start buggered. Luckily a capacitor replacement fixed it - mustn't have liked running at 240v!

Thanks for your reply. Much appreciated. Have learnt a great deal about electric motors (and generators) in the last few weeks, and need to put a plug in for Clayton at EMR Christchurch who's been very helpful

best
Andrew