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Approved Diesel Fuel Shut-off Valve
Looking for producers of type approved fuel shut-off valves.

Hello,

As stated, I am looking for producers of marine type approved (any member of IACS - BV, LR, DNV-GL, RINA, ABS etc.) diesel fuel shut-off valves.

Specifically, on Cummins KTA38M engine, we need to have a separate fuel shutoff valve, as per class requirements. This would be a NO valve, which would close upon activation of any of the safeties. As we usually put this valve in the fuel line after the pump, we have a 16 bar pump pressure, and standard flow of 400 l/h. Piston valves would be preferred, as no pressure is required to open. Control voltage is 24VDC.

Previously, we have used Danfoss EV224B, but had some issues, so looking to change it.

The latest I've found is GSR Type 35, but it is 5 times more expensive than Danfoss.

Is there any producer of piston type fuel shut off valves that has type approval for them, and a normal price?

vsegvic,

You've probably already done this, but the only thing I can offer is to contact various valve sales companies, who may represent one or more different valve manufacturers and describe your requirements and ask them for their recommendations. You may have to talk to several companies in your area or region, but that's about the best way to find items like this. Let the salespeople--after you clearly describe your requirements--make recommendations. They may, or may not, have something that meets your needs.

Many salespeople move between companies over time, and while the company they presently work for may not have something suitable for your application they may know of another manufacturer that does. Or, they can recommend someone who might have something which would work for you.

A good "specification" is all that's usually required, one that clearly defines the application and the requirements. A good salesperson will take that, and if they don't know of something immediately, will call the valve manufacturers they represent and ask if they have something which will meet the specification (or forward the specification to the valve manufacturers they represent and ask their application engineers for recommendations).

You can try searching the World Wide Web, but sometimes that can be very frustrating--because not all sites and people describe their products in the same way with the same terms. That's another reason why it's a good idea to have a specification to forward to either salepersons or valve manufacturers for them to read, and ask questions if they have any, and make recommendations to you. They want to sell valves, and a good salesperson will take your specification and do their best to find something to sell you. If you can cite industry standards in your specification, that would be very helpful--and sometimes, a really good salespeople who understands the industry can also help with that.

Beware, there are people who will say, "This valve isn't exactly what you want, but it meets almost all the specifications!" Thank them for their time, and move on. Some will try to do that, and you just need to be vigilant and polite, and say, "Thanks!" and move on.

You can contact salespeople via the Web or by phone. But, give a good salesperson a good specification, and you will be pleasantly surprised at what you will get in return.